Tuesday, 25 September 2012

Curves

An interesting comparison between the original platform 1 curve and the reconstructed one today.

14 comments:

Howard said...

Are those catch points at the end, Bill?

Jim Boyles said...

No, they are points leading to a headshunt and the horse box dock that was at this end of the station. You will have noticed previous references to the "horse dock wall" on this site, before. Due to instability, it is now buried behind the Northern end of Platform 1. The vehicles you can see on the right of the original photograph could well be horse boxes.

Anonymous said...

Great shots! Well done everyone for such an accurate reconstruction.

Geoff said...

Fantastic job!

Is the fence across the trackbed by the Springfield Lane bridge in the distance the northern limit of "operations"? Do the railway own the trackbed beyond this point or is it Sustrans/someone else?

Bill said...

Hi Geoff,
Yes that's the extent of GWR ownership. Sustrans
are the owners through to Honeybourne.
Bill

Anonymous said...

Moreton Tramway?

But if so why here?

Toddington Ted said...

I understood that the owner of the railway land north of Broadway to Honeybourne was the local authority (Worcs CC)and that they had an agreement with Sustrans but that the land should be left in such a way that a railway could be rebuilt over it. Certainly the new arrangements at Honeybourne and the panel of track under the new double track overbridge on the Oxfrod Worcester Line at Honeybourne as a "statement of intent" would point to Sustrans not actually owning the land. I'm sure the Council owns it but I could have outdated information of course! One thing's for certain, we need to get back to Honeybourne by rail to unlock the full potential of the GWSR.

Anonymous said...

Sustrans owns it. Check at the LAnd Registry

Richard Johnson said...

I thought that newer members might be interested to know that in the late 1980's, the GWSR Plc negotiated to purchase the abandoned trackbed from Broadway to Honeybourne, from British Rail Property Board for just £5.00 (five pounds); and to accept responsibility for the overbridges.

A neighbouring farmer raised an objection, and it would have meant a full and costly public enquiry to defeat him.

The Plc had very limited funds in those days and the decision was taken to abandon the proposed purchase, and concentrate on what was already owned.

Without that farmers objection, the Plc would have owned the trackbed to Honeybourne since about 1988 - long before Sustrans came on the scene.

Toddington Ted said...

Thanks for the update Anon and Richard. I guess we are so lucky to have what we have.

Anonymous said...

I believe the sustrans were refused planning permission because they wanted to remove several thousand tonnes of ballast (by road), remove some of the parapet walls (to make it easier for cyclist to get on the path) and create a zig-zag cycle path over the entire trackbed that would have made re-instatment virtually impossible.

Toddington Ted said...

Yes, I'm relieved that my memory wasn't totally shot; I thought that there had been an issue with Sustrans regarding future use of the Broadway-Honeybourne trackbed and I recall the details now thanks to your reminder!

Howard said...

Thanks Jim. It was a bit far away but i should have guesed the

hunting crowd of Broadway would have justified a horse box dock.

Anonymous said...

The GWSR article at http://www.gwsr.com/news/2011/august/double-track-at-honeybourne-once-again-%E2%80%93-and-passive-provision-for-gwsr.aspx says "we do have a good and open relationship with Rail Paths Ltd who own the trackbed from Broadway by-pass to the outer edge of Honeybourne. They are supportive of us working together in the future, as and when we jointly firm up plans and funding."

(Railway Paths Ltd is a Sustrans subsidiary)

There are lots of places where preserved railways and cycle paths coexist, eg. Avon Valley, Welsh Highland.... I'm sure there's space for both on Broadway->Honeybourne.